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4 comments

  • Lindy on June 24, 2014 at 5:19 pm said:

    Hi Britanny:

    I am a professional singer and I’ve had t.s. since the age of 5; however, it went undiagnosed until the age of 36!!!! I’m now 66.

    Lately I have been drinking more coffee than usual because I am semi-retired and don’t have to worry about acid reflux from the caffeine bothering my singing as much. But I have noticed that my tics are way worse than ever. It hit me this a.m. that maybe that was due to the extra coffee I’m drinking so I did some googling and found your site. I am happy that I did and love your writings. Thanks for the great advice. I will immediately switch to decaf (yuck)….except for maybe one cup in the moring????

    • brittanyfichterwrites@gmail.com on June 25, 2014 at 7:11 am said:

      I appreciate your kind words, and I can definitely understand the desire for the coffee! While I’m not professional, I sing on my church’s worship team. The thing I want most between practice and the service is a nice cup of coffee to help with allergies. Unfortunately, I’ve noticed my tics jump to a new level on those days, and even my anxiety attacks are much more frequent. Since I switched to drinking decaf, both tics and anxiety attacks have been much less frequent during the church services (or other times when I have to do a lot of sitting still). I hope you can find a happy medium that works for you!

      Out of curiosity, what style of music do you sing? And please come back and share your thoughts anytime!

  • Shane graves on June 27, 2017 at 10:18 pm said:

    I myself have dealt with anxiety mine tire life I grew up in an unstable environment my father was an abusive alcoholic and at a young age just by hearing the door slam a certain way I knew it was going to be a good night or bad night so essentially anxiety has become part of me from that this dark experience as a child and last year around August or September 2016 I had a nervous break down which caused me to throw myself in my saviors arms many people at the church I attend tell me it is unbelief when I have anxiety or fear and I love what you wrote because it is exactly how I feel God it does not look down at me for having anxiety but it is like a thorn in my side and it does cause me to run to my saviors arms on a daily basis especially at night when my mind won’t shut off and I can’t sleep I cry out to him knowing he is there so the anxiety causes me to run to my savior Jesus and people want to tell me their opinions on unbelief and anxiety and I’m not just trusting God enough but that’s not it God made me this way and God brought me through my childhood and I do not believe God gave me this anxiety it just developed as a child in a unstable violent home so thank you for sharing it is an absolute blessing to hear others dealing with this and yet still loving the Lord with all their heart soul mind and strength!

    • brittanyfichterwrites@gmail.com on July 23, 2017 at 7:48 pm said:

      It always hurts my heart when (albeit well-meaning) Christians try to place the blame on the faith of the one who is struggling with anxiety. While it’s true that a Christian must have faith in Christ and His salvation, many don’t understand that anxiety, PTSD, and other disorders are just as much illnesses or injuries that need treatment as a broken arm or Strep Throat. It gives me joy to hear that you have found safety in the arms of Christ. Don’t let others pull you into thinking you can “magically” heal yourself through means of works or sayings or “declarations.” There are no quick fixes. I have found that God often has used my anxiety to draw me closer to him, and that involves running to him over and over again with prayer and praise and meditating on His promises. He is helping me, no doubt. I’ve found so much more peace as the years go. But the way God grows us in grace takes a lifetime, and sometimes, we need the help of medication or counseling along the way. Don’t be afraid to get professional help if you need it. Talking to your doctor can start you in the right direction with insurance, and perhaps you could find a professional Christian counselor who is equipped to help you with such struggles if it becomes too much for you to handle on your own. But don’t let anyone try to make you feel like your intrinsic worth is based on your ability to heal yourself. God knows we are weak, and He is near to the brokenhearted (Psalm 34:18). What a great and loving God we serve!

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